In the News

Mountain Magnolia Inn has had the pleasure of being mentioned in respected publications and on websites. Here are a number of different examples.

Carolina Living

If you’re looking for some honest-to—goodness, old—fashioned tranquility, then head over to the Mountain Magnolia Inn, within a sprawling 1868 Victorian home that Peter and Karen Nagle resurrected from oblivion more than a dozen years ago. The couple added a second story and a restaurant that serves five course meals,
four days a week. The house was built by Col. James H. Rumbough, who then owned and operated the Mountain Park Hotel, where the Hot Springs Resort and Spa is now located — a perfect metaphor for the confluence of old and new in a town that has become a restorative escape for hikers and Sunday day-trippers alike.

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The Island Eye News

“The town’s best bed and breakfast is the Mountain Magnolia Inn and Retreat, which has been the sight of the most elegant resort in the area since one, was built on the sight in 1886.”

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This Old House

‘It looked like a one-story ranch,’ Karen says, ‘yet, inside it had 11-foot ceilings and these incredible plaster ceiling medallions.’

Word about the sale of “the old Rumbough place” spread quickly through Hot Springs, and neighbors began stopping by with photos and gushing descriptions of the original home – a a three-storey Italianate mansion, with a wrap-around porch and a tower.”

“It was built in 1868 by Colonel James Henry Holcombe Rumbough, who ran a stagecoach from Greenville, Tennessee, to Greenville, South Carolina. But the building was decapitated in the 1950’s, perhaps it was in disrepair – though some say it was to get rid of ghosts. The house’s history, and the town’s gregariousness piqued Karen’s interest.”

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Mountain Express

One hour out: Fall foodie getaways that don’t stray far from Asheville

As splashes of crimson, gold and burnt orange start to overtake the landscape, a Western North Carolina day trip is a great way to enjoy fall in all its fiery glory. It’s easy to find good eats in Asheville, but even if you’re heading out of town, you don’t have to settle for subpar food.

Citizen Times

Asheville area chefs share winter farm-to-table secrets

Cooking from locally produced ingredients has its challenges. Living in a region with four distinct seasons means working with what’s available at each time of year. Summertime brings bounty, but winter months are an opportunity for chefs to get creative.

Southern Living

The Beauty of the French Broad

Follow an ancient river through Appalachia to explore one of the South’s most stunning landscapes.

NC Museum and Library Services

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